Editorial March/April 2020

 

Dear audience, dear artists,

TQW’s highlights in March and April include such artists as French performer Anne Lise Le Gac who will introduce us once more to her absurd assemblage dimensions of texts and materialities; Algerian-French choreographer Nacera Belaza, from whose works emanates a strange trance-like force of attraction; and Amanda Piña, whose highland dances from Puebla, Mexico, will put into perspective the value of geology in the context of climate change. Furthermore, Italian choreographer Chiara Bersani, whose subtle poetic solo about the mythological figure of the unicorn will undermine the regimes of the social gaze, is part of our programme at TQW Studios in April. Kat Válastur will take us on a journey through surreal and emotional territories in-between the worlds. And late April will see the opening of Performance Passage curated by Andrea Maurer, a platform dedicated to the virtuoso use of words and language – no other than legendary poet and artist Gerhard Rühm will head the first part of this series. Later that month, choreographer Alexandra Bachzetsis will examine our contemporary production of visual imagery with her latest work – in her usual formally and aesthetically captivating style. And, finally, after its huge access and ongoing demand, Florentina Holzinger’s already almost iconic TANZ will see another run at TQW, just in time before it will be presented at this year’s Theatertreffen in Berlin.

Our theory section will offer some intriguing new insights – in cooperation with MUK, both the exciting new talk series Salon Différence and its focus on Kunst & Erregung (art & arousal) as well as the cooperative university research platform Elfriede Jelinek will be presented for the first time at TQW in March. Oxana Timofeeva, an expert in the field of animal studies, will also give a lecture that same month. And pioneer of (German) men and masculinity studies, art historian Klaus Theweleit, will be our guest in April: His most popular book “Male Phantasies”, and its precise analysis of gender stereotypes and their intrinsic relationship to fascistic societal tendencies, has never been more relevant than today.

Bettina Kogler (Artistic Direction & Programme) & Christa Spatt (Programme)

 
Loading