Consul and Meshie

Antonia Baehr, Latifa Laâbissi & Nadia Lauro (DE/FR)
Performance
© Nadia Lauro 
Antonia
Baehr

is a Berlin-based choreographer, performer, filmmaker and visual artist.

Her pieces are characterized by a non-disciplinary way of working, examining the fiction of the everyday and the fiction of the theatre.

make-up-productions.net

 
 
Latifa
Laâbissi

studied contemporary dance in France and with the Cunningham studio in New York. Mixing genres, reflecting upon and redefining formats, Laâbissi’s work seeks to bring onstage multiple offstage perspectives; an anthropological landscape in which stories, figures and voices are placed and highlighted.

Dance “codes” are disturbed by recalcitrant bodies, alternative stories, montages of materials infiltrated by certain signs of the times.

figureproject.com

 
 
 
 
Nadia
Lauro

is a visual artist and set designer. She has been developing her work for several decades in various contexts – scenic spaces, landscape architectures and museums.

She has conceived set designs, environments, and visual installations with strong dramaturgical power, thus generating new ways of seeing and being together.

nadialauro.com

Antonia Baehr, Latifa Laâbissi & Nadia Lauro (DE/FR)
Thu04./
Fri05. 
Oct
18.00–21.30/
Kunsthalle Wien

Admission is included with symposium day ticket. Come and go anytime.

English/French/
Arabic/German

Within the scope of Antarctica. A Symposium on Alienation

“Monkeys and apes have a privileged relation to nature and culture for western people: simians occupy the border zones between those potent mythic poles. In the border zones, love and knowledge are richly ambiguous and productive of meanings.” — Donna Haraway, Primate Visions, 1989

Apes, at least great apes are among the “almost human” animals. This “almost” has turned them into a surface onto which humans project their ideas of what it means to be human. At the beginning of the 20th century the chimpanzees Consul and Meshie lived among humans as humans and came to consider themselves human. Antonia Baehr and Latifa Laâbissi adopt their own apish identities – with no guarantee for historical accuracy. Hairy and morally free, insolent and shameless, these two human monkeys occupy Nadio Lauro’s visual installation, which is roughly and casually nested away from the stage in quiet little corners of theatres and museums. From two leather limousine seats, whose furry innards gradually spread into the room, Consul Baehr and Meshie Laâbissi exhibit themselves for 3 1/2 hours at a time while the audience is free to come and go. A human being is an ape for human beings. Or: two human figures act as apes that act as humans for humans. They lose control and regain it by training each other. They zealously learn know-hows and don’t-know-hows. They sleep and lapse into apathy. They cannibalize poses, iconic dances, and stitch feminist slogans. Consul and Meshie represent hybrid figures that question the violence of assignations and make a mess in the categories of nature/culture, man/woman, and self/other.

Credits

Concept & Interpretation
Antonia Baehr, Latifa Laâbissi
Visual Installation
Nadia Lauro
Costumes
Antonia Baehr, Latifa Laâbissi, Nadia Lauro
Sound and Light Design
Carola Caggiano
Adminstration & Diffusion
Alexandra Wellensiek / make up productions & Fanny Virelizier, Charlotte Cancé / Figure Project
Design Game “French Theory Memory”
Hilà Lahav
Thanks to
Vinciane Despret, Donna Haraway, Les Laboratoires d’Aubervilliers, Melanie Poppe, Rayna Rapp, Constanze Schellow, Emilia and Kathrin Schlosser, Mia Sellmann, the entire team of HAU Hebbel am Ufer, Jean-Yves and Danielle Auvray
A co-production by Figure Project / make up productions and HAU Hebbel am Ufer, Le Magasin des horizons (Grenoble), Xing/Live Arts Week VII (Bologna). Funded by Hauptstadtkulturfonds and Senate Department for Culture and Europe.
Antonia
Baehr

is a Berlin-based choreographer, performer, filmmaker and visual artist.

Her pieces are characterized by a non-disciplinary way of working, examining the fiction of the everyday and the fiction of the theatre.

make-up-productions.net

 
 
Latifa
Laâbissi

studied contemporary dance in France and with the Cunningham studio in New York. Mixing genres, reflecting upon and redefining formats, Laâbissi’s work seeks to bring onstage multiple offstage perspectives; an anthropological landscape in which stories, figures and voices are placed and highlighted.

Dance “codes” are disturbed by recalcitrant bodies, alternative stories, montages of materials infiltrated by certain signs of the times.

figureproject.com

 
 
 
 
Nadia
Lauro

is a visual artist and set designer. She has been developing her work for several decades in various contexts – scenic spaces, landscape architectures and museums.

She has conceived set designs, environments, and visual installations with strong dramaturgical power, thus generating new ways of seeing and being together.

nadialauro.com

 
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