Reasons for the rage – and why it has been overlooked

Luca Di Blasi (CH)
Theory/Lecture
© Stefan Münger 
Luca
Di Blasi

studied German language & literature and philosophy at the University of Vienna. He obtained a doctor’s degree in philosophy at the Catholic University in Eichstätt in 2001 and qualified as a professor of the philosophy of religion at the University of Bern in 2015. He has been teaching philosophy there since 2014 and has headed the project Disagreement Between Religions. Epistemology of Religious Conflicts since 2018.

He is an associate member at the ICI Berlin. His research focuses on the philosophy of religion, political theology as well as media theory and cultural theory.

Luca Di Blasi (CH)
Wed27. 
Jun
18.00/
TQW Studios

In German

With the resurgence of right-wing populism, the so-called “cultural left” has become the focus of criticism. It is said to have directed its focus for too long on categories like race, sex and gender, neglecting social problems in the process. This would suggest that the problem could be solved by putting renewed emphasis on the concept of “class”. However, the problem runs deeper than that: it lies in the fact that class and social standing, conflicts of distribution and recognition are separated from one another as if by a rift. This has led to the specific problem remaining unconsidered for such a long time of those people so many of whom have given their votes to right-wing populists: the “threatened majorities” (Ivan Krastev) and, especially in the USA, the white men (and women) who are relegated or are threatened by relegation. The lecture examines this rift and intends to show how the specific “rage” of many white men can be understood and properly addressed by politicians simply by a parallactic consideration (in Slavoj Žižek’s sense) of class and social standing/recognition.

Luca
Di Blasi

studied German language & literature and philosophy at the University of Vienna. He obtained a doctor’s degree in philosophy at the Catholic University in Eichstätt in 2001 and qualified as a professor of the philosophy of religion at the University of Bern in 2015. He has been teaching philosophy there since 2014 and has headed the project Disagreement Between Religions. Epistemology of Religious Conflicts since 2018.

He is an associate member at the ICI Berlin. His research focuses on the philosophy of religion, political theology as well as media theory and cultural theory.

 
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