Gravity’s Garden

Elizabeth Ward (US/AT)

Training/Advanced Level
© Julie Calbert  
Elizabeth
Ward

is a choreographer and a performer currently living in Vienna. Previously she has lived and worked in New York City, Athens, Brussels, and Portland, Oregon. Her work explores the collective histories of dance lineages embedded in a dancer’s muscle memory as a living archeology.

 

Currently she is developing a new piece with visual artist Julia Zastava and musician Ana Threat on hauntings, specifically looking at the complicated political histories of early Modern Dance. As a performer she has participated in the works of DD Dorvillier, Miguel Gutierrez, Anne Juren, Jennifer Lacey, and Frédéric Gies a. o. Elizabeth earned her B. A. from Bennington College in Vermont where she focused on improvisation as a performance practice.

Elizabeth Ward (US/AT)

Tue07. 
May
10.45–12.30
TQW Studios

This training runs from 6 till 10 May 2019.

Gravity has been a theme in dance classes for ages. But what if we focus on it again? Like really focus! Meaning we keep our attention on the downward dropping of weight in our body and the changing sensation of that weight throughout the class and throughout the week. Simultaneously let’s let our dancing come alive with the springtime plant energy of the season. We tend to think of plants growing up but they also grow down and to the sides.

Class will work with plant imagery mixed with closed eyed somatic awareness explorations before practicing some basic ballet together. Ballet as a form came into being before Newton’s theory of Gravity so let’s drop the sometimes serious nature of gravity (and ballet) to focus on our relationship to ground. Let’s play with re-discovering gravity in our dancing like a plant growing roots and rhizomes and perhaps with a few epiphytes (air plants) in the room!

Elizabeth
Ward

is a choreographer and a performer currently living in Vienna. Previously she has lived and worked in New York City, Athens, Brussels, and Portland, Oregon. Her work explores the collective histories of dance lineages embedded in a dancer’s muscle memory as a living archeology.

 

Currently she is developing a new piece with visual artist Julia Zastava and musician Ana Threat on hauntings, specifically looking at the complicated political histories of early Modern Dance. As a performer she has participated in the works of DD Dorvillier, Miguel Gutierrez, Anne Juren, Jennifer Lacey, and Frédéric Gies a. o. Elizabeth earned her B. A. from Bennington College in Vermont where she focused on improvisation as a performance practice.

 
Loading